Notes about things regarding scuba diving that I have come to know.

Pete's Southern Maine Regional Dive Site Guide
Crescent Beach, Wells
On Webhanet Drive North of Eldredge Rd., Wells
(Northern most site of 2 from this parking location)

Located on Webhanet drive just north of Eldredge Road is this site. It can also be reached by taking Webhanet drive south from the intersection with Mile Road. On Webhanet drive you will be looking for a crescent shaped parking lot on the sea side of the street. In season a porta-potie will be there for your convenience. The paved lot (2012) does have a fee from 8:00 AM to 5 PM in season. A parking ticket is purchased from a vending machine which takes coin or credit card. The $2.50 / hour per carload is still good fun and will help keep parking available. It can fill up but turnover is usually moderate. We have always found a spot. The dive site is about two house lots north where a ramp & steps take you up over the seawall to the beach entry. I'll stop just short of giving it hidden jewel status. My wife has been known to call it her favorite.

This site is also a fantastic skin diving site especially from about one hour after low tide to 1 hour before high tide. From the entry area at less than high tide you can see that to the right of the entry there is a huge field of ledges. As they fill in on the rising tide in particular the water can be delightfully warm and clear and juvenile lobster as well as assorted small fish and crabs can abound. The nicest skin-dive is to follow the ledge straight out and work your way around it clockwise to enter the semi sheltered rocky shallow area we call the nursery. The entry as mentioned is a sand beach entry and the shelter of the ledge usually manages to keep the surf manageable.

Abutting the ledge is the sandy bottom of Wells beach. When diving this site we head straight out then tack right to find the base of the ledge. We then usually work our way up onto the ledge either keeping the sandy bottom in sight or knitting up and down to avoid being too far up into the ledge. Depths can reach 30+ feet but expect to spend most of your time in the 16-20 foot range with lots of critters and nice light.

If you decide to wander up into the ledges watch out for the falling tide. As the water drops the waves can begin breaking on the ledges making a shallow dive challenging. Been there done that.

There can be a slight long shore current. We are generally following natural features and it's a non-issue. If you find yourself swimming in an expanse of sandy bottom just keep this in mind. I have observed this the most while skin-diving.

You can expect to find the usual critters. Under some boulders nice frilled anemones can be found. Some of these boulders will be away from the ledge so wandering out onto the sandy bottom can bring you some pleasant surprises. Some of the plant cover is very colorful. It was at this site that we saw a lavender Sea Raven blending perfectly into lavender bottom cover.

Entry view at near low tide. The good stuff is not as far away as it looks.

This Dive Site at a Glance:

  • SCUBA: Yes
  • SKIN-DIVE: Yes
  • PARKING: Varies-see text
  • TOILETS: In season
  • TIDE: Variable
  • SEASONS: All
  • EXPOSURE: E/NE
  • ENTRY/EXIT: Easy
  • FOOD: None
  • GPS: 43.294653,-70.568066
  • Google Maps accepts GPS points.

Here is a view of the parking lot and walk to the entry.

This shows the dive we like to make up along the ledges.

If you have time, are good with air and want a little adventure it is possible to make a site to site dive from the companion site that is just south of the parking lot you are using. When we made this dive it was from south to north and it was an easy dive though it did clock in at 102 minutes with a max depth of 18 feet. That being said this is not a novice dive. Only make this dive with nice sea conditions. As you round the point between sites you will be meandering between ledges and may find yourself in relatively shallow water. That's no place to be with the surf rolling. Other than that just bear left and watch for the beach!

This page created January 2008 *** Revised July 2012